Hespeler Heritage Centre News

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In Memoriam: Fred Stewart

In Memoriam: Fred Stewart

Frederick Roy Stewart, Jan 20 1926 – May 20 2020. Royal Canadian Navy – WW2 Veteran, Police Chief Hespeler, Staff Inspector Waterloo Regional Police, 53 Year Member of the Royal Canadian Legion – Branch 272 Hespeler.

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Kibitzing with the Bickersons

Kibitzing with the Bickersons

It was the usual summer weekday afternoon at the Hespeler Legion, slow and quiet, before the rush of members who drop in after work. Being on holidays, I had dropped by for a golden mug of my...

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A Storied Past

A Storied Past

An application for rezoning has been filed by JENC Investments Ltd. with the City of Cambridge regarding the property at 408 Guelph Avenue. The large building on the property has an interesting…

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When Things Were Simpler

When Things Were Simpler

I am regularly amazed by the bureaucratic maze that must be negotiated to get a project underway and completed. We have made our lives so complicated, that sometimes it is easier to just walk away,…

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Krueger Butcher Shops

Krueger Butcher Shops

In the former Town of Hespeler the name Krueger was synonymous with butchers! Two generations of this family operated shops in the core area.

Beginning in 1905, Arthur James Krueger opened his shop on the south side of Queen East, between Cooper Street and Tannery Street East, under the name “Krueger Meats”. Simply by calling telephone number 11, your meat order would be filled and…

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General Stores

General Stores

When the first settlers ventured into this area in the early 1800s, the area was known as the “Queen’s Bush”.

The earliest were Mennonite farmers from Pennsylvania who came by way of a small number of native trails and a few “slashed” trails into the area along the Grand and Speed Rivers. One “slashed” trail was created in April 1827 by John Galt on his way to found the settlement of Guelph. His…

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Love is in the Air

Love is in the Air

The Hespeler Post Office was a busy place on Monday mornings; and this day in late February of 1973 was no different. The first mail truck had arrived around 5am and the work floor was humming, a “beehive” of activity. In the letter carrier section, the six carriers were sorting up their routes for delivery.
It had been a hard winter of cold, snow and ice; but this day was promising to be sunny and pleasant…

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